Future Acquisitions for the Norwegian Defence Sector 2017-2025 (excerpt)
(Source: Norway Ministry of Defence; issued April 11, 2017)
This document gives an overview of future acquisitions for the Norwegian Defence Sector in the period 2017 - 2025.

The long-term planning process outlines the continuous development of the Norwegian Defence Sector with respect to organisation, infrastructure (garrisons and bases), personnel (numbers, composition and qualifications) and materiel (existing equipment and new acquisitions). This process is carried out under the direction of the Royal Norwegian Ministry of Defence (MoD).

The Long Term Plan – Materiel forms the basis for all materiel procurements in the short term (4 years), the medium term (8 years) and the long-term perspectives (20 years). Annually, the plan is updated to reflect updates based on changing requirements, available resources and progress in on-going acquisitions.

The Government recognises the vital role the defence industry plays in support of the Armed Forces’ capabilities. This role ranges from the provision and maintenance of military equipment to the delivery of a wide range of support services. The Government’s national strategy for the defence industry was recently revised, and presented as a new White Paper to Parliament (Meld. St. 9 (2015–2016) Nasjonal forsvarsindustriell strategi) and covers the relationship between the Defence Sector and the defence industry.

The main reasons for presenting an updated White Paper are the developments in the security sphere over the recent years, changes in the defence market both nationally and internationally, changes in terms and conditions, the introduction of the EU’s defence and security procurement directive, in addition to an increased focus on preparedness and security of supply.

The new White Paper focuses on national security interests and security of supply as basis for the new policy and strategy. The policy will continue to maintain and develop an internationally competitive Norwegian defence industry in areas of relevance for the Norwegian Defence Sector.

The Norwegian defence industry contributes substantially to our national economic growth, technological and industrial development, export related income and high-tech related employment. The aim of the strategy is to secure good cooperation between the defence sector and the defence industry based on our sector’s need for cost-efficient deliveries of defence equipment and services.

The strategy implies that Norway increasingly should cooperate with other nations on defence procurement. The strategy will also contribute to necessary predictability for Norwegian export companies. The Government upholds the governmental support programme for marketing and industrial cooperation.

A central feature in the annual updating of the Long Term Plan – Materiel is the preparation and publication of an unclassified overview of long-term materiel requirements. This publication does not examine each planned project in detail but creates opportunities for in-depth discussions between the Defence Sector and industry. In this way, industry can get an early insight into potential materiel investments.

The aim is to maintain highly skilled companies that individually or in cooperation with others, are able to support the needs of the Defence Sector. Having a proven and highly skilled industry is also fundamental for being able to compete in the international defence market that in many ways remains a closed one.

The materiel investment projects are subject to decisions and approval by the MoD and the Parliament.

The projects listed in this publication are not approved for implementation. It is emphasized that any project not yet formally approved may subsequently be terminated or changed without any further explanation or liability. The Government has initiated a Land Power Study and its’ recommendations may influence the contents of the Land Systems’ Program.


Click here for the full report (43 PDF pages) on the Norwegian MoD website.

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