Navy Completes LRASM Milestone Test Event
(Source: US Naval Air Systems Command; issued Dec 12, 2017)
One of two Long-Range Anti-Ship Missile (LRASM) being developed by Lockheed Martin for the US Navy launched during a test from a B-1B bomber during a Dec. 8 test off the coast of California. (US Navy photo)
POINT MUGU, Calif. --– The U.S. Navy is closer to delivering its new Long Range Anti-Ship Missile (LRASM) after completing another milestone test flight from an Air Force B-1B Lancer Dec. 8 over Point Mugu Sea Test Range in California.

During the test, aircrew aboard the B-1B simultaneously launched two missiles against multiple moving maritime targets for the first time.

“The completion of this test marks another significant accomplishment for the innovative team of government and industry professionals committed to fielding dominant surface warfare capability on an accelerated timeline,” said Capt.Todd Huber, LRASM program manager.

When operational, LRASM will provide flexible, long-range, advanced, anti-surface capability against high-threat maritime targets. It will play a significant role in ensuring military access to operate in open ocean and the littorals due to its enhanced ability to discriminate and conduct tactical engagements from extended ranges.

Early operational capability for the LRASM is slated for 2018 on the U.S. Air Force B-1 Lancer and 2019 on the U.S. Navy F/A-18E/F Super Hornet.

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Lockheed Martin's Long Range Anti-Ship Missile Marks another Successful Flight Test
(Source: Lockheed Martin; issued Dec 12, 2017)
ORLANDO, Fla. --- Lockheed Martin successfully fired production-configuration Long Range Anti-Ship Missiles (LRASM) from a U.S. Air Force B-1B bomber.

During the test over the Sea Range at Point Mugu, California, B-1B aircrew simultaneously launched two LRASMs against multiple maritime targets, meeting the primary test objectives, including target impact.

"This continued success with LRASM provides confidence in its upcoming early operational capability milestone, putting a proven, unmatched munition into the U.S. Navy and U.S. Air Force inventories," said David Helsel, LRASM program director at Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control. "The successful flight demonstrates LRASM's continued ability to strengthen sea control for our forces."

LRASM is designed to detect and destroy specific targets within groups of ships by employing advanced technologies that reduce dependence on intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance platforms, network links and GPS navigation in electronic warfare environments. LRASM will play a significant role in ensuring military access to operate in open ocean/blue waters, owing that to its enhanced ability to discriminate and conduct tactical engagements from extended ranges.

LRASM is a precision-guided, anti-ship standoff missile based on the successful Joint Air-to-Surface Standoff Missile - Extended Range (JASSM-ER). It is designed to meet the needs of U.S. Navy and Air Force warfighters in contested environments. The air-launched variant provides an early operational capability for the U.S. Navy's offensive anti-surface warfare Increment I requirement to be integrated onboard the U.S. Air Force's B-1B in 2018 and on the U.S. Navy's F/A-18E/F in 2019.


Headquartered in Bethesda, Maryland, Lockheed Martin is a global security and aerospace company that employs approximately 97,000 people worldwide and is principally engaged in the research, design, development, manufacture, integration and sustainment of advanced technology systems, products and services.

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