A Shadowy War’s Newest Front: A Drone Base Rising from Saharan Dust (excerpt)
A Shadowy War’s Newest Front: A Drone Base Rising from Saharan Dust (excerpt)
(Source: New York Times; published April 22, 2018)
By Eric Schmitt
AIR BASE 201, Niger --- Rising from a barren stretch of African scrubland, a half-finished drone base represents the newest front line in America’s global shadow war.

At its center, hundreds of Air Force personnel are feverishly working to complete a $110 million airfield that, when finished in the coming months, will be used to stalk or strike extremists deep into West and North Africa, a region where most Americans have no idea the country is fighting.

Near the nascent runway, Army Green Berets are training Nigerien forces to carry out counterterrorism raids or fend off an enemy ambush — like the one that killed four American soldiers near the Mali border last fall.

Taken together, these parallel missions reflect a largely undeclared American military buildup outside the battlefields of Iraq and Afghanistan, often with murky authorities and little public attention, unfolding in remote places like Yemen, Somalia and, increasingly, West Africa.

In Niger alone, the Pentagon in the past few years has doubled the number of United States troops, to about 800 — not to conduct unilateral combat missions, but to battle an increasingly dangerous Al Qaeda, the Islamic State and even loosely associated extremist groups with proxy forces and drone strikes.

The military’s missions in Niger are expected to come under scrutiny in a long-awaited Defense Department investigation into the deadly Oct. 4 ambush that is nearing release. (end of excerpt)


Click here for the full story, on the New York Times website.

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