Two Russian Tu-160 Strategic Bombers Complete 16-Hour Flight Above Arctic
(Source: TASS; published Feb 01, 2020)
MOSCOW --- Two Russian Tu-160 strategic bombers have performed a 16-hour flight above the neutral waters of the Barents Sea, the Norwegian Sea and the Arctic Ocean, the Russian Defense Ministry said.

"The flight assignment lasted more than 16 hours. During the flight, planes of the long-range aviation performed aerial refueling," the ministry said in a statement.

Russian long-range aircraft perform regular flights over neutral waters of the Arctic, North Atlantic, Black and Baltic Seas, and the Pacific Ocean. All the flights are carried out in strict compliance with the international rules on the use of airspace, without violations of other states’ borders.

Earlier in the day, the North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD) said earlier on Saturday that it had "identified two Tu-160 Blackjack Russian Bombers entering the Canadian Air Defense Identification Zone on Friday, Jan. 31, 2020."

"The Russian aircraft remained in international airspace and did not enter United States or Canadian sovereign airspace," NORAD said in a Twitter post.

NORAD Commander Gen. Terrence O’Shaughnessy, said the country’s adversaries "continue to flex their long-range weapons systems and engage in increasingly aggressive efforts," but assured that North American Aerospace Defense was ready to defend the US and Canada from any attack.

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NORAD Identifies Russian Aircraft in Canadian Air Defense Identification Zone
(Source: North American Aerospace Defense Command; issued Jan 31, 2020)
PETERSON AFB, LA. --- North American Aerospace Defense Command positively identified two Tu-160 Blackjack Russian Bombers entering the Canadian Air Defense Identification Zone on Friday, Jan. 31, 2020.

The Russian aircraft remained in international airspace and at no time did the aircraft enter United States or Canadian sovereign airspace.

“Our adversaries continue to flex their long-range weapons systems and engage in increasingly aggressive efforts, to include the approaches to the United States and Canada,” said General Terrence J. O’Shaughnessy, NORAD Commander. “NORAD is driven by a single unyielding priority: defending the U.S. and Canada, our homelands, from attack.”

NORAD employs a layered defense network of radars, satellites, and fighter aircraft to identify aircraft and determine the appropriate response. The identification and monitoring of aircraft entering a US or Canadian ADIZ demonstrates how NORAD executes its aerospace warning and aerospace control missions for the United States and Canada.

NORAD is a bi-national command focused on the defense of both the United States and Canada, the response to potential aerospace threats does not distinguish between the two nations and draws on forces from both countries.

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